The beauty in the grey

High up in the mountains of Norway

The grey sky is laden with snow,

Which turns the slag heaps and old copper works

Into objects of beauty.

Next to the old smelting house, where copper was melted,

The waterways create graceful patterns

Topped with an icing of snow.

Even the brick tower holding the power lines

Is turned into an electric beauty.

Yes, my friends, there is beauty in the grey.

For more skies, please visit: Skywatch.

229 thoughts on “The beauty in the grey

  1. Juhuuu!! Now I know where you are! =) I have benn there myself, latest last year, a very beautiful place! Oh.. I have forgot to blog about them.. :O I have so many photos, but just a few are blogged.. from time to time.. I guess this is for you and others to..

    Enjoy my friend, your exciting time in the mountains..! 🙂

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  2. Gorgeous grey beauty!!!! Made me shiver though–since it looks so COLD there…. Brrrrrrr…. As much as I love winter and snow, I am really ‘into’ Spring now!!!!! Ready for some warm weather to stick around for awhile!!!!!

    Hugs,
    Betsy

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  3. Herlig bildeserie fra Røros. Dette er et sted jeg kjenner meget godt!
    Jeg er enig, – mye flott i det grå!
    Ha en himmelsk kveld og ei fin helg!

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  4. These remind me of the American west. I thought at first they were black and white, but then spotted a bit of color. Very nicely done, Fiona.

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  5. I have never been to a location with snow and snow all around. The images talk and say I should visit location where there is snow.
    Thanks for sharing.

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  6. Lovely in its simplicity!
    I can feel the crispness that must be in the air as I look down at that cold running water.
    You indeed captured the beauty in the grey.

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  7. Incredible photos! Isn’t it brilliant how your mind sets your eyes out to grab hold of any color available. Your quest to find color has turned into a blog full of great beauty. Thank you for sharing with us all.

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  9. I’ll grant you poetic licence to be romantic about the blanketing snow’s beautification of the slag heaps. But doesn’t it make you cry that they were left, just like that – raw and ugly and foreign to that pristine place? Though, I grant you, the log cabins of the workers are indeed beautiful, in their way. Nevertheless, congratulations. Well done.

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  10. What a beautiful poetic post! I loved how you showed us a different side of grey.:) Would love to visit this place one of those days.

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  11. Hello, Lady Fi… your pictures said it so eloquently. The scenes are beautiful indeed. They’re quite refreshing especially for the likes of us who are roasting in the tropical summer heat, ahaha. Thanks for sharing this and regards! 🙂

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  12. Some people tell me that seeing a winter landscape makes them depressed because they think of everything being dead. I, however, agree more with you. I find the grey and white beautiful. For some reason, it actually is something that fills me with hope when I see it. The second image is my favorite of the three. I hope to see more of your beautiful pictures.

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  13. I have been a black and white photographer for years. Color always seems so garish in comparison to the subtleties and textures found in the pure white through grey to pure black spectrum. There is nuance in the bi-chromatic spectrum which one can only find by studying its extremes and contemplating them through the grey transition zones. This is very much the heart of the Tao, which understands and holds the polarities, yet finds itself truly manifest within the relationship of transition between the two. And, yes, well, having lived in Europe, I find europeans much more able to enter into those grey zones.

    Lovely work. I did a similar series in an old, brick, broken-down, rubble heap of one of the many abandoned paper mills that dot the landscape here in New England america. Thanks, really enjoyed the perspective and tonality. I could study the subtleties in these photographs for hours.
    Which, I know, is exactly how they were made.

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  14. It seems a very melancholic place.
    As if the snow’s coming is the final word
    in the final act
    of the play of life.

    Winter is cold and still
    in Norway.

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  15. Yes, Roros is also one of my favourite places in Norway. I stayed there in a hotel with a Norwegian cousin. I also dedicated several of my posts to this wonderful little mining town.

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  16. This is close to what my world looks like right now… 🙂 You found beauty in the dreary.

    (These images are classic you, Fiona, but I still wonder what made this post your most popular… you have so many that are stunning.)

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      1. AhH, nice! Then you probably got many more hits than comments on this post, too. My “most popular” post has few comments, but I suspect the subject is one that is often Googled. 🙂 I trust you have healed well from the frostbite. Take care, Lady Fi. (I don’t have enough free time to blog these days, but hopefully will be able to post now and then.)

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