Tree of ages

I’m in awe of trees: they seem to be wisdom distilled.

I think it has something to do with their age. Most trees will be here much longer than you or I.

I wonder if they hold a memory of history in their roots and the promise of the future in their branches?

Take this tree, for example. It’s taller than a house, much taller –  and has a preservation order on it. Why? Because it is about 750 years old! Once upon a time, it was thirty metres taller – in its heyday – but it has since been cut back to help it live longer. It is expected to live for another hundred years or so.

When it was but a seedling, the lake came up to the house and fed its roots. Time pushed back the lake’s waters, but the tree thrived.

Just think of all that amazing history it has been a part of! 750 years ago saw the end of the Viking Age and the start of the Middle Ages.

The Crusades were being fought, the Byzantine Empire was re-emerging and Genghis Khan established the Mongol Empire. Dante was born, Birger Jarl, the founder of Stockholm, died – and Budvar beer was brewed for the first time in Bohemia.

I’m in awe of trees: they are the repository of memories.

For more wisdom, please visit: My World!

49 responses

  1. So very true. What an honour to be in its presence. Lovely.

    Like

    March 9, 2010 at 05:40

  2. I love old, knarled trees too.

    Like

    March 9, 2010 at 05:48

  3. I’m fascinated by trees as well and some of the ones particularly in the northwest and California have been around for so long!!! Talk about seeing history, many of them seen times long before this country was even a reality. The redwoods are particularly beautiful. Wonderful post, Ladyfi, as always! Hope you have a great week!

    Sylvia

    Like

    March 9, 2010 at 05:52

  4. Beautiful.

    Like

    March 9, 2010 at 06:00

  5. I agree – old trees have a lot to tell…

    Like

    March 9, 2010 at 06:11

  6. Trees are comforting and always there, if we don’t cut them down – and, of course, forests are necessary to keep us alive. But they don’t remember a damn thing, or rather they don’t chose to share it with us.

    Lovely thoughts.

    Like

    March 9, 2010 at 09:03

  7. I am in awe of trees too. And not only is the tree beautiful, your description of them as repositories of memories is so evocative.

    Like

    March 9, 2010 at 09:44

  8. I think about that sometimes too…

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    March 9, 2010 at 09:52

  9. But what of the memories that come from looking deeply into the flames of a log fire?

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    March 9, 2010 at 10:00

  10. I agree. lovely photo and not only that the sun at the background adds a character.

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    March 9, 2010 at 10:47

  11. very nice. and when you walk among them, if you are really quiet you can hear their whispers of times gone by…

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    March 9, 2010 at 11:21

  12. FASCINATING trees……..I do too love trees and take even a lot of care of them…..i’m living in a kork tree and chestnut wood….
    The story is just delighting!
    ciao ciao and thanks for your visit in Tuscany!!!!!!!
    elvira

    Like

    March 9, 2010 at 12:15

  13. I love them too. 🙂

    Like

    March 9, 2010 at 12:17

  14. And to be associated with it now! Great feeling reading about this. If only trees could talk!

    Like

    March 9, 2010 at 13:01

  15. You do a great job of expressing thoughts many of us have, but don’t articulate as well. I also love the picture; Trees are beautiful in their bare stage — like seeing their “bones” — their actual form. Glad it has a preservation order.

    Like

    March 9, 2010 at 13:43

  16. I have tree love too – I’ve never hugged one though. Did you know there are so many people now that belong to Tree Hugger groups Maybe it’s something I shouldn’t take too literally.

    Like

    March 9, 2010 at 13:48

  17. 750! WOW!

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    March 9, 2010 at 14:14

  18. It is amazing what they have lived through being that old.

    Like

    March 9, 2010 at 14:21

  19. The age of the tree is simply wonderful. I hadn’t thought about a tree being that old. Your picture of it is a beautiful tribute to its majesty.

    Like

    March 9, 2010 at 14:21

  20. Very interesting post! We have a tree along side our driveway which frames our garage, or did until I came home one day and my husband had lopped off the branch that went out over the drive. I cried when I saw how bare the driveway looked. He admitted he had made a mistake, a very uncommon event for him….the admission not the mistake! We have a large piece of property for our area and have many, many more trees but I liked the way this one looked as you drove in. There’s no do-over with trees.

    The thought of the history the tree in your post has seen in wonderful to consider.

    Like

    March 9, 2010 at 14:33

  21. LadyFi: What a neat story of the tree from the past ages. It has been here for such a long time.

    Like

    March 9, 2010 at 15:09

  22. Hi There, Thanks for visiting my blog. I hope you come back often. My hubby and I are retired and living on the Cumberland Plateau in Tennessee (2000 feet above sea level). We love hiking and searching for waterfalls. We also love traveling, grow flowers including roses, and I love backyard birding.

    We have lots of beautiful shade trees in our yard and area. Our community association has a rule that we cannot cut down a tree unless we get permission and then plant a new one. I love that rule!!!!

    Come back anytime.
    Hugs,
    Betsy

    Like

    March 9, 2010 at 15:51

  23. It is great fun thinking about the history that an old tree was around for. My son always makes me try to count the rings on stumps so we can guess how old it was.

    Like

    March 9, 2010 at 15:51

  24. Beautiful shot. The trees when they shed their leaves with bare branches also look good.

    Like

    March 9, 2010 at 16:53

  25. ‘I wonder if they hold a memory of history in their roots and the promise of the future in their branches’
    love your thinking!

    Like

    March 9, 2010 at 18:20

  26. WoW, just imagine the tales that tree could tell! It sure made this Ozarks farm chick ponder upon the many stories that have taken place under that big old tree. Thanks, beautiful post, sweetie.

    From the hills and hollers of the Missouri Ponderosa, ya’ll have a wonderfully blessed day!!!

    Like

    March 9, 2010 at 19:08

  27. Amazing just how old these trees are and it would be good fun if they could tell us of the changes they have seen.
    Loved the photo.

    Nuts in May

    Like

    March 9, 2010 at 19:14

  28. I wish our backyard had bigger trees. I miss climbing them.

    Like

    March 9, 2010 at 20:55

  29. Po

    Love this post. Love trees too.

    Like

    March 9, 2010 at 21:26

  30. I love trees too. Around here it is common for people to “top” their trees which makes me cry. Really.

    Like

    March 10, 2010 at 00:14

  31. Clive

    Have always had a special love of trees!

    When anyone close to us has died – we have planted a special tree in their memory. So for great-grandparents, grandparents and my Mom and several other relations and friends who have died – we now have trees growing in their memory.

    My Mom’s tree in particular, I dug up when we were leaving Ireland 11 years ago to go live in Brussels. It grew in a huge pot in the back garden of our house in Brussels for five years – then I shipped it back to Ireland and now it is planted in our back garden here around in Dublin and growing huge! It was one tree I needed to keep close to me!

    Like

    March 10, 2010 at 00:16

  32. Clive

    ps – meant to say also, Alice should be fine! Thought it would be scarier than it was and there were lots of younger kids in the audience with us who loved it as well!

    Like

    March 10, 2010 at 00:18

  33. what a lovely perspective on trees! we should accord them the respect we show all elders – or rather, the respect we *should* show all elders.

    Like

    March 10, 2010 at 00:23

  34. PJ

    Oh, did I love this!!! I’ve often looked at a tree and tried to imagine the history it’s witnessed, the memories it holds in each molecule.

    The order of protection is a WONDERFUL thing!!! I don’t think they have such a thing here in the USA.

    And that the tree has been ‘pruned’ so that it lives another 100 years! BRILLIANT!!!

    Like

    March 10, 2010 at 02:11

  35. It is amazing isn’t it? Trees are so wonderful. I’m always telling the Little One how much we should appreciate trees.

    Like

    March 10, 2010 at 03:33

  36. I’m in awe of trees: they are the repository of memories.

    What beautiful words. I lvoe lying on the grass and looking up at a beautiful tree in my backyard. Not sure I could lie in the snow though….another beautiful picture too. You have a very real talent for photography. I would love a calendar of all this winter pics of yours.

    Like

    March 10, 2010 at 03:56

  37. 750 glorious years! YEAH TREES.

    I’d love to see a pic of it inthe summer too please.

    xo

    Like

    March 10, 2010 at 04:22

  38. You are so right. Trees should be celebrated.
    V

    Like

    March 10, 2010 at 04:49

  39. Stunning. Absolutely stunning. Imagine the countless living creatures that have called that tree (and it’s roots!) home.

    Like

    March 10, 2010 at 07:04

  40. I am fascinated with trees too. Such brave and strong tree that withstood time and weather.

    I am not only admiring the tree but also its surrounding beauty too.

    Like

    March 10, 2010 at 07:21

  41. kelli

    “repository of memories”……. a perfect description. They remember the cold winter winds, the children who climbed them each summer and the birds who made their homes in them… some great memories.

    Like

    March 10, 2010 at 09:10

  42. It is impossible not to believe that old trees have some sort of consciousness… Lovely photo and a thought-provioking text. Wether we realize it or not, we live among the ruins of former worlds….

    Like

    March 10, 2010 at 19:06

  43. I feel like climbing a tree every time I see this.

    Like

    March 11, 2010 at 00:34

  44. I wish trees could talk ,especially the one outside my exhusband’s house

    Like

    March 11, 2010 at 02:04

  45. I love how you started this post:
    I’m in awe of trees: they seem to be wisdom distilled

    love it very much.

    Like

    March 11, 2010 at 04:10

  46. I wonder what kind of tree it is. I love trees too..how people treat trees tells much about a person:)

    Like

    March 12, 2010 at 07:46

  47. Yes, a beautiful tree, against a very beautiful, tender sky.

    Like

    March 14, 2010 at 06:33

  48. Your words are full of wisdom and my heart is full as I take in the wonders of your beautiful world. Thanks so much for sharing.
    Hugs and blessings,
    Small Reflections

    Like

    March 14, 2010 at 21:39

  49. in this too we are kindred spirits.
    I could stand at the base of a tree as prayer.
    I do .

    Like

    March 15, 2010 at 03:19

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